Wellness and Vaccination Programs

Help us keep your pet healthy by bringing him or her in for regular exams and vaccinations. Dogs and cats (and other pets) age far faster than people, so significant changes in your pet’s health can happen in a short time. Wellness programs allow us to diagnose diseases and conditions early, when they’re easier to treat or manage. Often, we can help prevent diseases entirely, just by ensuring that your pet has received appropriate vaccinations and preventives. We recommend that healthy adult dogs and cats visit us once a year. Puppies, kittens, senior pets, and pets with health issues or illnesses need more frequent checkups. We’ll work with you to create a wellness program, including a vaccination and prevention protocol, for your pet. Call us today to schedule your pet’s wellness exam.

Puppy Wellness

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Congratulations – you have a new puppy!

You’ve anticipated the new arrival by ‘puppy proofing’ your home and had lots of fun choosing the carrier, bed, blanket, toys and other supplies he or she will need. This frisky little creature is sure to bring you much joy. In return, you can make a major contribution to your pet’s longevity, happiness and quality of life by providing him or her with good nutrition, giving attention in a safe, sanitary environment and regular checkups at your veterinarian.

Your new puppy should visit a veterinarian as soon as possible!

The first visit will probably include:

  • Thorough physical examination to determine his or her state of health.
  • Check for internal parasites (tapeworm, roundworm, etc.), if you can bring a stool sample for analysis. Blood tests may also be done.
  • Initial vaccination and/or a discussion of the types of vaccinations your puppy needs and when they should be scheduled.
  • Discussion about whether your puppy should be sterilized (spayed or neutered) and when.

This first health check will give your veterinarian the information he needs to advise you on your puppy’s immediate diet and care. Plus, it will give him a “knowledge base” from which, on subsequent checkups throughout your pup’s life, he can better evaluate, monitor and manage your pet’s health.

Make your new puppy feel at home!

Show your puppy the special places where he can eat, sleep and eliminate and, since he’s probably quite overwhelmed, give him some quiet time to himself to let him adjust to the unfamiliar sights and sounds of his new home. Be sure, if there are also young children in the home, that they are taught that a puppy is not a toy, but a living creature who must be treated with gentleness and respect. As early as 8 weeks old, your puppy is capable of learning specific lessons – so start house-breaking and teaching simple obedience commands the day you bring him home. Your veterinarian can suggest the best training methods and, if you wish, recommend a good obedience school. Your pup will find learning fun and easy, and with your positive reinforcement, he should remember his lessons well!

If your dog is… In human terms, that’s
6 months 10 years
8 months 13 years
10 months 14 years
12 months 15 years
18 months 20 years
2 years 23 years
3 years 26 years
4 years 32 years
5 years 36 years
6 years 40 years
7 years 44 years
8 years 48 years
9 years 52 years
10 years 56 years
11 years 60 years
12 years 64 years
13 years 68 years
14 years 72 years
15 years 76 years
16 years 80 years

Spaying or Neutering your puppy

Many veterinarians believe that spaying or neutering not only helps solve the serious problem of unwanted pet overpopulation but also makes for friendlier, easier-to-live-with pets. Spayed female dogs are more relaxed, while neutered males are less likely to roam, ‘spray’ or urine-mark their territory, or fight with other males. Plus, sterilization has health benefits – it helps to minimize the risk for cancers of the reproductive organs and the mammary glands in females and reduces the incidence of prostate problems in males.

Spaying removes the uterus and ovaries of a female dog, usually after the age of six months. A major surgical procedure, it is performed under general anesthesia and most often involves an overnight stay at an animal hospital. Complications are rare and recovery normally is complete within two weeks.

Neutering, also carried out under general anesthesia, removes the testicles of a male dog through an incision at the base of the scrotum. Usually performed when the puppy is about six months old, it necessitates only a brief hospital stay. Full recovery takes about seven to ten days.

Kitten Wellness

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Congratulations – you have a new kitten!

You’ve anticipated the new arrival by ‘kittenproofing’ your home and had lots of fun choosing the carrier, bed, blanket, toys and other supplies he or she will need. This adorable little bundle of fluff is sure to bring you much joy. In return, you can make a major contribution to your pet’s longevity, sanitary environment, and regular checkups at your veterinarian.

Your new kitten should visit a veterinarian as soon as possible!

The first visit will probably include:

  • Thorough physical examination to determine his or her state of health.
  • Check for external parasites (fleas, ticks, lice, ear mites).
  • Check for internal parasites (tapeworm, roundworm, etc.), if you can bring a stool sample for analysis. Blood tests may also be done.
  • Initial vaccination and/or a discussion of the types of vaccinations your kitten needs and when they should be scheduled.
  • Discussion about whether your kitten should be sterilized (spayed or neutered) and when.

This first health check will give your veterinarian the information he needs to advise you on your kitten’s immediate diet and care. Plus, it will give him a “knowledge base” from which, on subsequent checkups throughout your pup’s life, he can better evaluate, monitor and manage your pet’s health.

Make your new kitten feel at home!

With sensitive handling and friendly contact for at least an hour a day, your new kitten should soon be very comfortable with you and his new home. Be sure, if there are also young children in the home, that they are taught that a kitten is not a toy, but a living creature who must be treated with gentleness and respect. And provide your pet with lots of opportunities for interesting, challenging play that will satisfy his natural insticts. Toys that he can pretend to ‘hunt’ and capture and special posts that he can scratch (instead of your carpets and furniture) will help make your kitten a joy to live with.

If your cat is… In human terms, that’s
1 month 5-6 months
2 months 9-10 months
3 months 2-3 years
4 months 5-6 years
5 months 8-9 years
6 months 14 years
7 months 15 years
8 months 16 years
1 year 18 years
2 years 25 years
3 years 30 years
4 years 35 years
5 years 38-40 years
6 years 42-44 years
7 years 45 years
8 years 48 years
9 years 55 years
10 years 60 years
11 years 62 years
12 years 65 years
13 years 68 years
14 years 72 years
15 years 74 years
16 years 76 years
17 years 78 years

Spaying or Neutering your kitten

Many veterinarians believe that spaying or neutering not only helps solve the serious problem of a burgeoning population of unwanted cats but also makes for friendlier, easier-to-live-with pets. Spayed female cats are more relaxed, playful and affectionate, while neutered males are calmer and less likely to ‘spray’ or urine-mark their territory, wander away from their home or fight. Plus, sterilization has health benefits – it minimizes the risk for breast cancer in females.

Spaying removes the uterus and ovaries of a female cat, usually around the age of six months. A major surgical procedure, it is performed under general anesthesia and most often involves an overnight stay at an animal hospital. Complications are rare and recovery is normally complete within ten days.

Neutering, also carried out under general anesthesia, removes the testicles of a male cat. The small wounds that result usually heal in about a week. Less complicated than spaying, it is often performed on a ‘day surgery’ basis when the cat is 6 to 12 months old.

8-9 years

Senior Pet Wellness

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As your pet ages it becomes very important to evaluate their health and well being on an yearly basis. Along with your annual vaccination visit, we are pleased to be able to provide you with a wellness examination and systemic evaluation for your older pet.

As part of the national Celebrating Seniors program we are pleased to offer you this service for you and your pet.

Our Wellness packages start with a complete physical exam of your pet, and will include some or all of the following tests, depending on the recommendation of the veterinarian.

Full Physical Examination:

  • Head to Tail check of your pet including:
    • Dental check for tartar, gingivitis, infection. Mouths with lots of tartar build up and gingivitis will hide problem teeth that may be causing pain to your pet. As well bacteria from the infected mouth can enter the blood stream causing cardiac, kidney, or liver problems. A problem in the mouth affects your pet’s total well being.
  • Listen to the Heart and Lungs:
    • Listening to your pet’s heart lets us know if there is any early sign of heart problems. This can be indicated by raspy sounds in the lungs, an irregular beat or rhythm, or a murmur. Many of these problems if detected early can be managed with medication that will ensure your pet lives a long and happy life.
  • Feeling the legs, belly, and body:
    • This lets the Veterinarian feel for any small or large bumps or lumps. These can indicate something simple as a non-threatening Lipoma, or a more concerning tumor. It also allows us to check for any early signs of pain/discomfort which can indicate arthritis, inflammation associated to systemic diseases such as kidney disease.
  • Conversation with YOU:
    • We also want to talk to you about your pet. You see your pet everyday and are the best source of information we have for the well-being of your pet. The veterinarian or animal nurse will discuss with you any concerns you have noticed, whether it is an increase in drinking and urinating, or not eating as much or as well. Subtle changes to your pet’s regular normal routines can indicate big problems. Help us catch them early.